Peregrine-having tendency to wander

RSS
little-trouble-grrrl:

joan jett and kathleen hanna 

little-trouble-grrrl:

joan jett and kathleen hanna 

persephoneholly:

ten-and-donna:

kissnecks:

THIS OKAY

You want to get kids out of foster care and into good, loving homes? I’ve got a simple solution to your problem.

Did you know LGBT couples are more likely to adopt older, children of color and disable children than straight couples? LGBT couples tend to adopt ‘undesired’ children more (basically kids no one else wants.)


We have children without homes and parents without children, and the only things stopping them from being together are laws based on hate and discrimination. This is just cruel.

persephoneholly:

ten-and-donna:

kissnecks:

THIS OKAY

You want to get kids out of foster care and into good, loving homes? I’ve got a simple solution to your problem.

Did you know LGBT couples are more likely to adopt older, children of color and disable children than straight couples? LGBT couples tend to adopt ‘undesired’ children more (basically kids no one else wants.)

We have children without homes and parents without children, and the only things stopping them from being together are laws based on hate and discrimination. This is just cruel.

(Source: beaconpress)

jsimonsmith:

23-year-old Harnaam Kaur has polycystic ovary syndrome, an endocrine disorder which often causes male pattern hair growth in women. Harnaam, who is from Berkshire, UK, began to experience significant hair growth by age 11 and teasing soon followed. As the bullying grew more intensive and classmates began calling her “beardo” and “sheman”, she began to self harm and even considered taking her own life.
When she was baptized as a Sikh at age 16, Harnaam decided to adhere to the traditional Sikh tenet against hair removal. Her parents were opposed to the decision, concerned about her ability to have a normal life; however, she was determined. As Harnaam explained to HuffPost, “I wanted to make my own decisions and live for myself – not anyone else. I’d had enough of hiding. I’d had enough of the bullying and the self-harming and the suicidal thoughts. I wanted to change my whole outlook on life.”
Since making the courageous decision to live life as she chooses, Harnaam says that her confidence has soared. She even decided to recently participate in a photography exhibit, Project 60, celebrating the world’s best facial hair. In speaking about the exhibit, which marks the launch of Beard Season, a non-profit organization focused on skin cancer awareness, Harnaam stated, “It’s incredible to be the only bearded woman among all these men. It makes me feel really strong… When I first started growing my beard it was for religious reasons but as the years have gone by I’ve kept it for more personal reasons. It makes me feel like a brave, confident woman who isn’t afraid to break society’s norms.”
“All that matters to me at the moment is that I love myself,” she explained. “I love my beard and all my other little quirks – my tattoos, my scars, stretch marks and blemishes. I want other women to find the strength that I have. If I had any message it would be to live the way you want – it’s your journey and it’s your life.”
Harnaam’s photo for the exhibit by photographer Brock Elbank is below. To view several more photos from the exhibit on The Guardian, visit here.
For an excellent picture book about a joyous young girl who is not afraid to be herself, quirks and all, we highly recommend I Like Myself” for ages 3 to 8.
For many stories about girls grappling with body images issues, visit A Mighty Girl’s Body Image” section.
If you’d like to teach your kids to appreciate differences and foster their empathy for others, we’ve highlighted our favorite books on this theme for preschool and early elementary-aged children in our post The End of Bullying Begins With Me.”
To help tweens and teens learn how to stand up for themselves and others in the face of bullying or intolerance, check out the reading recommendations in our post, Taking a Stand Against Bullying.”
And, for over 200 books confidence-building books for Mighty Girls, visit our Self-Confidence / Self-Esteem” section.
 Source: A Mighty Girl on Facebook.

jsimonsmith:

23-year-old Harnaam Kaur has polycystic ovary syndrome, an endocrine disorder which often causes male pattern hair growth in women. Harnaam, who is from Berkshire, UK, began to experience significant hair growth by age 11 and teasing soon followed. As the bullying grew more intensive and classmates began calling her “beardo” and “sheman”, she began to self harm and even considered taking her own life.

When she was baptized as a Sikh at age 16, Harnaam decided to adhere to the traditional Sikh tenet against hair removal. Her parents were opposed to the decision, concerned about her ability to have a normal life; however, she was determined. As Harnaam explained to HuffPost, “I wanted to make my own decisions and live for myself – not anyone else. I’d had enough of hiding. I’d had enough of the bullying and the self-harming and the suicidal thoughts. I wanted to change my whole outlook on life.”

Since making the courageous decision to live life as she chooses, Harnaam says that her confidence has soared. She even decided to recently participate in a photography exhibit, Project 60, celebrating the world’s best facial hair. In speaking about the exhibit, which marks the launch of Beard Season, a non-profit organization focused on skin cancer awareness, Harnaam stated, “It’s incredible to be the only bearded woman among all these men. It makes me feel really strong… When I first started growing my beard it was for religious reasons but as the years have gone by I’ve kept it for more personal reasons. It makes me feel like a brave, confident woman who isn’t afraid to break society’s norms.”

“All that matters to me at the moment is that I love myself,” she explained. “I love my beard and all my other little quirks – my tattoos, my scars, stretch marks and blemishes. I want other women to find the strength that I have. If I had any message it would be to live the way you want – it’s your journey and it’s your life.”

Harnaam’s photo for the exhibit by photographer Brock Elbank is below. To view several more photos from the exhibit on The Guardian, visit here.

For an excellent picture book about a joyous young girl who is not afraid to be herself, quirks and all, we highly recommend I Like Myself” for ages 3 to 8.

For many stories about girls grappling with body images issues, visit A Mighty Girl’s Body Image” section.

If you’d like to teach your kids to appreciate differences and foster their empathy for others, we’ve highlighted our favorite books on this theme for preschool and early elementary-aged children in our post The End of Bullying Begins With Me.

To help tweens and teens learn how to stand up for themselves and others in the face of bullying or intolerance, check out the reading recommendations in our post, Taking a Stand Against Bullying.”

And, for over 200 books confidence-building books for Mighty Girls, visit our Self-Confidence / Self-Esteem” section.



Source: A Mighty Girl on Facebook.

(Source: mytherapistthinksimfunny)

xxdisneylandxx:

"I don’t get why some women are so afraid of men"

Heres your answer 

thefeministme:

VIA: Women’s Rights News
 

thefeministme:

VIA: Women’s Rights News

 

(Source: wordsofdiana)

slick-van-dyke:

Throwback to the beginning

Hey! That is a friend of mine you’re shaving! My sibling wants to come to you for their next cut. I need a way to contact you.

slick-van-dyke:

Throwback to the beginning

Hey! That is a friend of mine you’re shaving! My sibling wants to come to you for their next cut. I need a way to contact you.

three-patch-problem3:

ishouldntbeallowedoutinpublic:

who-lock-loki-lover:

amhil-has-thoughts:

riddleswithtom:

hatalie:

9 has no time for your philosophizing.

nine is tired of your crap

Nine was the sassiest. 

I don’t think I’ll ever be able to scroll past this gifset without reblogging.

Can we also appreciate Rose please? She’s like his back up sassyness and being all “Bitch please, not today.”

(Source: doctorwhodoctormarx)

(Source: broccoleafveins)